2022

Living Heritage Symposium

The San Antonio LivingHeritage Symposium is a collaborative forum bringing international and local heritage professionals, policy-makers, grassroots preservationists and academics together for an exchange of ideas leading to the development of best practices for safeguarding cultural heritage. 

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who should attend

Historic Preservationists, Heritage Management Professionals, Urban Planners, Architects, CulturalProperties Specialists, Cultural Resources Managers, Tribal Leaders, GrassrootsPreservationists, Diversity Officers, Academics working in relevant fields, and municipal employees engaged in economic departments, urban planning, development services and sustainability. 

Agenda

session 1

Dec 3

session 3

feb 4

session 2

Jan 7

Eve Picker
Duffie Westheimer
Felix Heisel
10:00 AM - 11:30 AM
SENSITIVE TREATMENT OF CULTURALLY SIGNIFICANT PROPERTIES

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Eve Picker
Duffie Westheimer
Felix Heisel
10:00 AM - 11:30 AM
Leveraging Living Heritage for Economic Prosperity

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Eve Picker
Duffie Westheimer
Felix Heisel
12:45 PM - 3:00 PM
CLIMATE HERITAGE

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session 1

January 6, 2022

4:00 PM - 5:00 PM CST

Opening Statement

Speakers:

Sara Bronin

AIA, Presidential Nominee ACHP Chair

session 2

January 7, 2022

10:00 AM - 12:00 PM CST

Climate Heritage

Managing heritage in the face of a changing climate is essential if we are to maintain and preserve what communities value, including tangible and intangible heritage. Local practices and traditional wisdom offer strategies to both adapt to a changing earth and contribute to the mitigation of greenhouse gas emissions. This discussion will consider community engagement, indigenous life ways, and preservation techniques that can create resilience and provide models for sustainable conservation of cultural heritage and climate action.

Speakers:

Hannah Fluck

Head of Environmental Strategy at Historic England

William Megarry

ICOMOS Climate Change and Heritage Working Group, Focal Point

Katie Carter

Historic Environment Scotland Circular Economy Project Officer

session 3

January 21, 2022

10:00 AM - 1:00 PM CST

Sensitive treatment of Culturally Significant Properties

Cultural significance is often not tied only to physical characteristics. Traditional design guidelines aren’t necessarily sufficient and these cases can be difficult utilizing traditional tools. San Antonio has developed a proven method for landmarking culturally significant properties but the treatment of these properties after designation is not always clear. This discussion will focus on treatment recommendations when the significance isn't architectural. Special use districts, new forms of designations, interpretation, incentives, and property owner assistance are possible approaches to be discussed.

Speakers:

Ken Bernstein

Principle City Planner, City of Los Angeles

Denise Gilmore

Senior Director Division Of Social Justice and Racial Equity, City of Birmingham

Susan Fayad

Coordinator Heritage and Cultural Landscapes at the City of Ballarat, Australia

session 4

February 11, 2022

10:00 AM - 12:00 PM CST

Leveraging Living Heritage for Economic Prosperity

Cultural heritage has the potential to build prosperity for communities that practice their living heritage, in turn, ensuring the continuity of the communities’ culture. The charge for this session is to develop recommendations for ways in which communities can keep their character, both tangible and intangible, by leveraging living heritage for economic development. Examples from around the world and the U.S. will be discussed. Final recommendations may include cultural tourism, traditional skills education, business training, and any other method with a proven success record.

Speakers:

Nefertitti Jackmon

Cultural Strategist & Community Displacement Prevention Officer, City of Austin

Felix Heisel

Assistant Professor, Assoc. AIA, AKBW, Circular Construction Lab, College of Architecture, Art and Planning, Cornell University

Duffie Westheimer

Northern Arizona Pioneers’ Historical Society Board of Directors, and the Townsite CLT Board

Eve Picker

Founder of Small Change

Speakers

 Felix Heisel
Felix Heisel
Felix Heisel is an architect and academic working towards the systematic redesign of the built environment as a material depot. He is an Assistant Professor of Architecture and the Director of the Circular Construction Lab at Cornell University, as well as a founding partner of 2hs architects and engineers in Germany. Heisel has received various awards for his work, most recently the International Green Solutions Award and the Zumtobel Special Prize for Innovation, and published numerous books and articles on the topic, including Urban Mining and kreislaufgerechtes Bauen (Fraunhofer IRB, 2021), Cultivated Building Materials (Birkhäuser, 2017) and Building from Waste (Birkhäuser, 2014). Heisel graduated from the Berlin University of the Arts and has been teaching and researching at universities around the world.
Denise Gilmore
Denise Gilmore
Senior Director Division Of Social Justice and Racial Equity, City of Birmingham
Denise E. Gilmore serves as Senior Director, Division of Social Justice and Racial Equity in the Office of Mayor Randall L. Woodfin in the City of Birmingham. She leads the Division comprised of the Office of Social Justice and Racial Equity, LGBTQ+ Affairs, Cultural Preservation, Faith-Based Initiatives, Policy, and Special Initiatives. The Division of Social Justice and Racial Equity seeks to create a just and equitable City in the distribution of resources and access to City government. Denise champions equitable preservation efforts for culturally significant heritage and historic resources. Her work includes stewardship of the Birmingham Civil Rights National Monument, created through presidential proclamation in January 2017 by President Barack Obama. Denise leads the restoration of the historic A.G. Gaston Motel, a Green Book site, on behalf of the City of Birmingham and in partnership with the National Park Service. Denise’s professional experience includes the National Trust for Historic Preservation in Washington, DC, where she advocated for preservation as a catalyst for neighborhood revitalization using her extensive experience in community development. In Kansas City, MO, she led the redevelopment of the historic 18th & Vine Jazz District. During her tenure, the Jazz District gained major new investments in mixed-income housing, small businesses, infrastructure, and greenspaces. Denise is a recognized authority on equitable redevelopment strategies in cultural districts. She has a M.B.A. in Finance and Business Administration from Rockhurst University in Kansas City, MO and a B.S. in Accounting and Business Administration from the University of Kansas. She has a Certificate in Community Economic Development from the University of Missouri-Kansas City Bloch School of Business.
Duffie Westheimer
Duffie Westheimer
Duffie has always lived in historic neighborhoods. She likes to be where the ghosts are. She learned to love architecture and explore communities during long walks around historic Cincinnati with her father. Flagstaff has been her home for 40 years. Duffie spearheaded creating Flagstaff’s first and currently only local Historic Residential District for the Townsite neighborhood. She is conducting the Townsite Oral History Project. Those two projects led her to found Townsite CLT. She holds degrees in Studio Art, Geography, Applied Cultural Anthropology and Museum Studies. Since finishing an MA she has continued her education with courses in Community Land Trusts, and Historic Preservation. Duffie and her family live in a 1940s Townsite neighborhood house constructed with ammunition boxes discarded by the Navajo Ordnance Depot west of Flagstaff. She served on the Southwest Oral History Association Board and the Arizona Historical Society Northern Chapter Board of Directors. She is currently on the Northern Arizona Pioneers’ Historical Society Board of Directors, and the Townsite CLT Board.
Eve Picker
Eve Picker
Eve Picker is the founder of Small Change, a real estate equity crowdfunding platform. Small Change raises funds for meaningful real estate projects building better cities everywhere. Like Kickstarter for real estate—but with a return. Small Change matches developers to investors, providing investment opportunities for everyone who cares about cities and wants to make change. All through a fluid and compliant technology platform. Picker’s world has always been wrapped around cities and change. Her background as an architect, city planner, urban designer, real estate developer, community development strategist, publisher, and instigator give her a rich understanding of how cities work, how urban neighborhoods can be revitalized, what policies are needed to do it, and the unique marketing that creates the buzz needed for regeneration. Amongst her many urban (ad)ventures, she’s developed a dozen buildings in blighted neighborhoods founded a non-profit, cityLAB, built Pittsburgh’s first tiny house, organized a speaker series, launched a Pittsburgh e-zine called PopCity, and established downtown Pittsburgh’s first co-working space. She also co-founded Pittsburgh’s wildly successful Open Streets program and now host a weekly podcast series about real estate impact investing. All of these experiences have helped her become one of the foremost thinkers on urban change. You can check out her projects here. Small Change honors include ranking as one of 7 top Real Estate Crowdfunding Platforms of 2020 by US News, nabbing Top Innovator in the “Capital” category by HIVE and Picker’s tenure as a Fellow at the Rockefeller Foundation Bellagio. And Small Change is one of twelve startups participating in Village Capital’s FinHealth US 2021 Accelerator.
Hannah Fluck
Hannah Fluck
Head of Environmental Strategy at Historic England
Hannah Fluck is Head of Environmental Strategy at Historic England, where she has overseen strategic work on climate change and heritage and approaches to threats to heritage and environmental values of cultural heritage. Hannah has a PhD in Pleistocene Archaeology and Human Evolution and joined Historic England in 2015 after working for over a decade in heritage management, planning and archaeology at Local Government in England. Hannah is a founding Steering Committee Member of the International Climate Heritage Network and regularly presents on climate change and heritage, including at the COP25 in Madrid and the first G20 Cultural Ministerial in 2021. Hannah is author of the Historic England Climate Adaptation Report and a contributing author to the third UK Climate Change Risk Assessment evidence report (2021). She is a Fellow of the Society of Antiquaries of London, and a visiting fellow at the University of Southampton.
Ken Bernstein
Ken Bernstein
Principle City Planner, City of Los Angeles
Ken Bernstein is a Principal City Planner for the Los Angeles Department of City Planning, where he leads the department’s Office of Historic Resources (OHR). He serves as lead staff member for the City’s Cultural Heritage Commission, has overseen the completion of SurveyLA, a multi-year citywide survey of historic resources, and has led the creation of a comprehensive historic preservation program for Los Angeles. He is also currently overseeing the Department’s Urban Design Studio and has previously directed other policy planning initiatives, including work on Community Plan updates, housing policy, and transportation planning. He previously served for eight years as Director of Preservation Issues for the Los Angeles Conservancy, the largest local non-profit historic preservation organization in the U.S. He has a Master’s Degree in Public Affairs and Urban and Regional Planning from Princeton University’s School of Public and International Affairs, and a B.A. in Political Science from Yale University. He is the author of Preserving Los Angeles: How Historic Places Can Transform America’s Cities, published by Angel City Press in 2021.
Nefertitti Jackmon
Nefertitti Jackmon
Nefertitti Jackmon is a Cultural Strategist and currently serves as the City of Austin’s first Community Displacement Prevention Officer. Jackmon leads the Housing and Planning department’s Displacement Prevention Division where she is instrumental in developing and leading programming and outreach, including the $300 million anti- displacement investments for Project Connect, described as a “comprehensive transit system expansion that will help transform Austin into one of the most sustainable, inclusive and innovative regions in the country. In this role, Jackmon, worked with community members, consultants, and City staff to co-create an Equity Tool to inform investment priorities for anti-displacement funds related to Project Connect. This tool will be instrumental guiding the use of anti- displacement funding to benefit people most at risk of displacement from transit investments. Since COVID-19, Jackmon has collaborated with department leadership, partners and staff to program over $74 million in tenant stabilization services including RENT, the City’s response to provide emergency rental assistance to households in need. Prior to joining the Housing and Planning Department, she served in the nonprofit sector for more than 25 years.
Sara Bronin
Sara Bronin
AIA, Presidential Nominee ACHP Chair
Sara Bronin is a Mexican-American architect, attorney, professor, and policymaker whose interdisciplinary work focuses on how law and policy can foster more equitable, sustainable, well-designed, and connected places. She is a Professor of the Cornell College of Architecture, Art, and Planning, an Associated Faculty Member of the Cornell Law School, and a Faculty Fellow of the Cornell Atkinson Center for Sustainability. Among other visiting positions, Bronin has taught at the Yale School of Architecture and the University of St. Gallen (Switzerland), and has been a visiting scholar at the University of Pennsylvania Kleinman Center on Energy Policy and the Sorbonne. Among other scholarly service, Bronin is an elected member of the American Law Institute and a past chair of the State & Local Government Section of the American Association of Law Schools. In addition to her books and treatises on land use and historic preservation law, she has written over two dozen articles on renewable energy, climate change, housing, urban planning, transportation, real estate development, and federalism. She also serves as the lead author of the land use volume of the forthcoming Restatement (Fourth) of Property. Among other current projects, Bronin leads the research team behind the groundbreaking Connecticut Zoning Atlas, the first interactive GIS map of all of the zoning regulations in a single state. Her book, Key to the City, under contract with W.W. Norton Press, will explore how zoning shapes our lives. Active in public service, Professor Bronin is a board member of Latinos in Heritage Conservation and an advisor for the National Trust for Historic Preservation and the Sustainable Development Code. As the founder of Desegregate Connecticut, she leads a coalition that successfully advanced the first major statewide zoning reforms in several decades. Previously, she chaired Preservation Connecticut, served on the city of Hartford historic preservation commission, and led Hartford’s nationally-recognized efforts to adopt a climate action plan and city plan, and to overhaul the zoning code. Bronin won several design awards for the rehabilitation of her family’s National-Register-listed 1865 brownstone. She holds a J.D. from Yale Law School (Harry S Truman Scholarship), M.Sc. from the University of Oxford (Rhodes Scholarship), and B. Architecture/B.A. from the University of Texas. While in law school, she clerked for then-Judge Sonia Sotomayor on the Second Circuit Court of Appeals. A seventh-generation Texan, Sara is a native Houstonian. She grew up working in her grandparents’ Mexican restaurant.
Susan Fayad
Susan Fayad
Coordinator Heritage and Cultural Landscapes at the City of Ballarat, Australia
Susan Fayad is the Coordinator Heritage and Cultural Landscapes at the City of Ballarat, Australia where she is coordinating the roll out of the Central Victorian Goldfields World Heritage Bid on behalf of thirteen local government partners. The bid is focused on building the social and economic resilience of the region by applying UNESCO’s Recommendation on the Historic Urban Landscape (HUL) and Sustainable Tourism Toolkit and the UN SDGs Since 2012, Susan has led the implementation of the HUL at the City of Ballarat as part of an international pilot program. She helped build the HUL approach into Ballarat’s long-term growth strategy, centralising heritage, culture, and local people’s values in the city’s future development. Susan is an active member of the global HUL program, contributing both internationally and locally in Australia. She lectures on HUL and coordinated & co-authored The HUL Guidebook with WHITRAP, China. Susan is a full international member of Australia ICOMOS, member of the ICOMOS Sustainable Development Goals Working Group and Co-Convenor of the Australia ICOMOS National Scientific Committee for Cultural Landscapes and Cultural Routes.
William Megarry
William Megarry
ICOMOS Climate Change and Heritage Working Group, Focal Point
Will Megarry is the ICOMOS Focal Point on Climate Change and Heritage. His research includes exploring the intersection between climate change and cultural heritage. He coordinated the Heritage on the Edge Project, a collaboration between ICOMOS, CyArk and Google Arts and Culture and is the Principal Investigator for the project: Values-based Climate Change Risk Assessment: Piloting the Climate Vulnerability Index for Cultural Heritage in Africa. An archaeologist, geographical information systems (GIS) and heritage management specialist with over 15 years commercial and academic experience. He has a particular interest in (and has published widely on) the application and transferability of geospatial technologies to archaeology and cultural heritage site management and protection, with a particular focus on issues of climate change. He is currently Senior Lecturer in Geographical Information science, teaching GIS and remote sensing, with a particular focus on their use a decision support tools for policy and management decision-making at Queen’s University Belfast.

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